help_outline Skip to main content
Shopping Cart
cancel

Recent News

Women Judges, and Women at Risk, Remain in Afghanistan

Women Judges, and Women at Risk, Remain in Afghanistan

This International Day of Women Judges, the World Must Reaffirm its Commitment to the Women, Peace, and Security Agenda

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – March 10, 2022, Today, on the International Day of Women Judges, the International Association of Women Judges (IAWJ) released a multi-signatory letter to the international community to plead for assistance in evacuating and resettling the remaining women judges who are trapped in Afghanistan.

 

The human rights situation in Afghanistan continues to deteriorate,” said Justice Susan Glazebrook, a judge of the Supreme Court of New Zealand/Te Koti Mana Nui and the president of the IAWJ. “The Taliban continue to ignore international norms, erase the lives of women, and commit violations. All while there is a severe humanitarian crisis. We call on world leaders to recommit to help those who are at risk and provide these women with safe passage and a permanent resettlement option where they can rebuild their lives.”

 

While women across the world are celebrating this week’s International Women’s Day, women who remain trapped in Afghanistan fear for their lives, and the lives of their families, have limited access to education and jobs, and can no longer travel unaccompanied under the Taliban rule. No women have been appointed to the de facto Taliban government since the takeover in August 2021.

 

“Women judges, who were the backbone of Afghanistan’s judicial system and upheld the rule of law, remain in danger. They are forced to hide in their homes with their families, unable to go out for fear of being recognized,” said Judge Patricia Whalen, a member of IAWJ and founder of the Rural Women Leadership Institute of Vermont. “We have seen great acts of kindness and assistance to date, but there is more that needs to be done.”

 

More than 30 organizations joined in the international appeal. Signatories to the letter include the Raoul Wallenberg Centre for Human Rights, International Association of Judges/ Union Internationale des Magistrats, the International Commission on Missing Persons, and the Center for International Human Rights at Northwestern University’s Pritzker School of Law. The letter is posted on the IAWJ homepage and is being circulated to all nations.

 

###

 

President Biden, Secretary General Guterres, and International Leaders:

 

Decades of evidence have shown that the repression and exclusion of women and girls is deeply connected to violence, economic stagnation, and state fragility and failure. The world recognized exclusion of women as a threat to international peace and security when the U.N. Security Council passed Resolution 1325 on Women, Peace and Security in October 2000. Empowered by this agenda, women around the world, in partnership with the international community, have achieved remarkable progress in some of the most conflict-ridden corners of the world. But even as we celebrate this progress, the fall of Afghanistan and the horrendous setbacks due to the power now in the hands of Taliban leadership, place this agenda and all it represents at a crossroads. Two decades of hard-fought progress in Afghanistan will be nullified unless the international community comes together to take meaningful action upholding the principles of UNSCR 1325.

 

Since the takeover of Afghanistan, the Taliban have made it clear they consider women second-class citizens and they have no intention of respecting women’s fundamental human rights.  They are excluded from employment and public life. They have effectively been erased from participating in Afghan society.

 

The United States and its international partners must uphold their promises to the people of Afghanistan and redouble efforts to evacuate at-risk Afghans, especially the remaining women judges and women human rights advocates. Afghan women who spent decades working with the international community to advance human rights, democracy, and the rule of law are now in hiding from the Taliban and other extremists. Their safety and security have been, at best, an afterthought in official rescue and resettlement operations.

 

Groups of volunteers and NGOs have so far had to fill this gaping hole. But with limited resources and lacking the capacity to do the work of governments to issue travel documentation, only a fraction of at-risk women leaders has been rescued and many remain at risk in Afghanistan. Among this vulnerable population are approximately 90 women judges and their families. This group includes women judges who presided over courts funded by the international community. These judges tried and convicted Taliban members for both regular criminal activity and in the special counter-terror courts and courts to eliminate violence against women. These women fought to develop the rule of law in the fledgling democracy. Their belief in and strong adherence to the rule of the law put thousands of Taliban and other extremists in jail. Many of those they convicted are now free and seeking revenge. Some are back in positions of power giving them the motive, opportunity, and resources to persecute and eliminate these women. The risk to these women and their sister prosecutors cannot be understated.

 

These women represent the incredible investment made over years in education, training and exchanges with Afghanistan and are a valuable resource for the future. They will be a key part of a future Afghanistan that can be integrated into the international community.

 

Therefore, we, the undersigned, write today on behalf of a global network of women’s rights defenders, including the International Association of Women Judges, legal institutions, universities, former senior government officials, women’s organizations working in Afghanistan, and other committed leaders who have joined together to help support at-risk women in Afghanistan. We request that international leaders step forward to help these women leave Afghanistan and provide them with permanent resettlement in a country – by issuing visas and associated travel documents and offering safe passage – where they can begin their lives anew and to bring the values they upheld to prosper and thrive in their new home, free from threat and persecution.

 

The credibility and future viability of the Women, Peace, and Security agenda will depend on the actions the international community takes to preserve it today.

 

Sincerely,

 

  • International Association of Women Judges
  • The Advocates for Human Rights
  • Afghan Legal Empowerment Portal
  • Justine Rukeba, AMS
  • War Crimes Research Office, Washington School of Law, American University
  • Sara Elizabeth Dill, Anethum Global
  • CAIR-Sacramento Valley/Central California
  • The Center for Peacebuilding
  • Central Asia Institute
  • Church World Service
  • Cohen Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, Keene State College
  • Core Skill Focus Organization (CSFO)
  • Equality Labs
  • Rebecca Blachly, Office of Government Relations, The Episcopal Church
  • Global Partnership for Afghanistan
  • Honor the Promise
  • International Association of Judges/Union Internationale des Magistrats
  • International Civil Society Action Network (ICAN)
  • International Commission on Missing Persons
  • Sunil Varghese, International Refugee Assistance Project (IRAP)
  • International Stability Operations Association (ISOA)
  • Internews
  • Irish Rule of Law International (IRLI)
  • MAPS-AMEN (American Muslim Empowerment Network)
  • Juliet Sorensen, Center for International Human Rights, Northwestern University Pritzker School of Law
  • The Raoul Wallenberg Centre for Human Rights
  • Rural Women Leadership Institute of Vermont
  • Special Operations Association of America
  • Tragedy Assistance Program for Survivors (TAPS) International
  • U.S. Committee for Refugees and Immigrants
  • Uplift Afghanistan Fund
  • Nejra Sumic, We Are All America
  • Women of Colour Working in Emergencies
  • Women's Campaign International
  • Robert Williams, Yale Law School


Mujeres juezas y mujeres en riesgo permanecen en Afganistán

Este Día Internacional de las Mujeres Juezas, el mundo debe reafirmar su compromiso con la Agenda de Mujeres, Paz y Seguridad

 

PARA PUBLICACIÓN INMEDIATA: 10 de marzo de 2022, hoy, en el Día Internacional de las Mujeres Juezas, la Asociación Internacional de Mujeres Juezas (IAWJ) emitió una carta de varios signatarios a la comunidad internacional para pedir ayuda en la evacuación y el reasentamiento de las mujeres jueces restantes. que están atrapados en Afganistán.

 

La situación de los derechos humanos en Afganistán continúa deteriorándose”, dijo la jueza Susan Glazebrook, jueza de la Corte Suprema de Nueva Zelanda/ Te Koti Mana Nui y presidenta de la IAWJ . “Los talibanes continúan ignorando las normas internacionales, borrando la vida de las mujeres y cometiendo violaciones. Todo mientras hay una grave crisis humanitaria. Hacemos un llamado a los líderes mundiales para que vuelvan a comprometerse a ayudar a quienes están en riesgo y brindarles a estas mujeres un paso seguro y una opción de reasentamiento permanente donde puedan reconstruir sus vidas”.

 

Mientras las mujeres de todo el mundo celebran el Día Internacional de la Mujer esta semana, las mujeres que siguen atrapadas en Afganistán temen por sus vidas y las vidas de sus familias, tienen acceso limitado a la educación y al trabajo, y ya no pueden viajar solas bajo el régimen talibán. Ninguna mujer ha sido nombrada para el gobierno talibán de facto desde la toma del poder en agosto de 2021.

 

“Las juezas, que fueron la columna vertebral del sistema judicial de Afganistán y defendieron el estado de derecho, siguen en peligro. Se ven obligadas a esconderse en sus casas con sus familias, sin poder salir por temor a ser reconocidas”, dijo la jueza Patricia Whalen, miembro de IAWJ y fundadora del Instituto de Liderazgo de Mujeres Rurales de Vermont . “Hemos visto grandes actos de bondad y asistencia hasta la fecha, pero aún queda mucho por hacer”.

 

Más de 30 organizaciones se sumaron al llamamiento internacional. Los firmantes de la carta incluyen el Centro Raoul Wallenberg para los Derechos Humanos, Asociación Internacional de Jueces/ Union Internationale des Magistrats, la Comisión Internacional sobre Personas Desaparecidas y el Centro para los Derechos Humanos Internacionales de la Facultad de Derecho Pritzker de la Universidad Northwestern. La carta se publica en la página de inicio de la IAWJ y se distribuye a todas las naciones.

 

###

 

Presidente Biden, Secretario General Guterres y Líderes Internacionales:

 

Décadas de evidencia han demostrado que la represión y la exclusión de mujeres y niñas están profundamente conectadas con la violencia, el estancamiento económico y la fragilidad y el fracaso del Estado. El mundo reconoció la exclusión de las mujeres como una amenaza para la paz y la seguridad internacionales cuando el Consejo de Seguridad de la ONU aprobó la Resolución 1325 sobre Mujeres, Paz y Seguridad en octubre de 2000. Empoderadas por esta agenda, las mujeres de todo el mundo, en colaboración con la comunidad internacional, han ha logrado avances notables en algunos de los rincones del mundo más conflictivos. Pero incluso mientras celebramos este progreso, la caída de Afganistán y los horrendos reveses debido al poder ahora en manos de los líderes talibanes, colocan esta agenda y todo lo que representa en una encrucijada. Dos décadas de arduos avances en Afganistán se anularán a menos que la comunidad internacional se una para tomar medidas significativas que defiendan los principios de la RCSNU 1325.

 

Desde la toma de Afganistán, los talibanes han dejado en claro que consideran a las mujeres ciudadanas de segunda clase y que no tienen intención de respetar los derechos humanos fundamentales de las mujeres. Están excluidos del empleo y de la vida pública. Se les ha borrado efectivamente de la participación en la sociedad afgana.

 

Estados Unidos y sus socios internacionales deben cumplir sus promesas al pueblo de Afganistán y redoblar los esfuerzos para evacuar a los afganos en riesgo, especialmente a las mujeres juezas y defensoras de los derechos humanos restantes. Las mujeres afganas que pasaron décadas trabajando con la comunidad internacional para promover los derechos humanos, la democracia y el estado de derecho ahora se esconden de los talibanes y otros extremistas. Su seguridad y protección han sido, en el mejor de los casos, una ocurrencia tardía en las operaciones oficiales de rescate y reasentamiento.

 

Hasta ahora, grupos de voluntarios y ONG han tenido que llenar este vacío. Pero con recursos limitados y sin la capacidad de hacer el trabajo de los gobiernos para emitir documentación de viaje, solo una fracción de las mujeres líderes en riesgo ha sido rescatada y muchas siguen en riesgo en Afganistán. Entre esta población vulnerable se encuentran aproximadamente 90 mujeres juezas y sus familias. Este grupo incluye mujeres juezas que presidieron tribunales financiados por la comunidad internacional. Estas juezas juzgaron y condenaron a miembros del Talibán tanto por actividades delictivas habituales como en tribunales especiales antiterroristas y tribunales para eliminar la violencia contra la mujer. Estas mujeres lucharon para desarrollar el estado de derecho en la incipiente democracia. Su creencia en el estado de derecho y su firme adhesión al estado de derecho llevaron a la cárcel a miles de talibanes y otros extremistas. Muchos de los que condenaron ahora están libres y buscan venganza. Algunas están de regreso en posiciones de poder dándoles el motivo, la oportunidad y los recursos para perseguir y eliminar a estas mujeres. El riesgo para estas mujeres y sus hermanas fiscales no puede subestimarse.

 

Estas mujeres representan la increíble inversión realizada durante años en educación, capacitación e intercambios con Afganistán y son un recurso valioso para el futuro. Serán una parte clave de un futuro Afganistán que pueda integrarse en la comunidad internacional.

 

Por lo tanto, nosotras, las abajo firmantes, escribimos hoy en nombre de una red global de defensoras de los derechos de las mujeres, incluida la Asociación Internacional de Mujeres Juezas, instituciones legales, universidades, ex altos funcionarios del gobierno, organizaciones de mujeres que trabajan en Afganistán y otros líderes comprometidos que han se unieron para ayudar a apoyar a las mujeres en riesgo en Afganistán. Solicitamos que los líderes internacionales den un paso al frente para ayudar a estas mujeres a salir de Afganistán y brindarles un reasentamiento permanente en un país, emitiendo visas y documentos de viaje asociados y ofreciendo un paso seguro, donde puedan comenzar sus vidas de nuevo y traer los valores que defendieron. prosperar y prosperar en su nuevo hogar, libres de amenazas y persecuciones.

 

La credibilidad y viabilidad futura de la agenda Mujer, Paz y Seguridad dependerá de las acciones que la comunidad internacional tome para preservarla hoy.

 

Atentamente,

  • Asociación Internacional de Mujeres Juezas
  • The Advocates for Human Rights
  • Afghan Legal Empowerment Portal
  • Justine Rukeba, AMS
  • War Crimes Research Office, Washington School of Law, American University
  • Sara Elizabeth Dill, Anethum Global
  • CAIR-Sacramento Valley/Central California
  • The Center for Peacebuilding
  • Central Asia Institute
  • Church World Service
  • Cohen Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, Keene State College
  • Core Skill Focus Organization (CSFO)
  • Equality Labs
  • Rebecca Blachly, Office of Government Relations, The Episcopal Church
  • Global Partnership for Afghanistan
  • Honor the Promise
  • International Association of Judges/Union Internationale des Magistrats
  • International Civil Society Action Network (ICAN)
  • International Commission on Missing Persons
  • Sunil Varghese, International Refugee Assistance Project (IRAP)
  • International Stability Operations Association (ISOA)
  • Internews
  • Irish Rule of Law International (IRLI)
  • MAPS-AMEN (American Muslim Empowerment Network)
  • Juliet Sorensen, Center for International Human Rights, Northwestern University Pritzker School of Law
  • The Raoul Wallenberg Centre for Human Rights
  • Rural Women Leadership Institute of Vermont
  • Special Operations Association of America
  • Tragedy Assistance Program for Survivors (TAPS) International
  • U.S. Committee for Refugees and Immigrants
  • Uplift Afghanistan Fund
  • Nejra Sumic, We Are All America
  • Women of Colour Working in Emergencies
  • Women's Campaign International
  • Robert Williams, Yale Law School


Les femmes juges et les femmes en danger restent en Afghanistan

En cette Journée internationale des femmes juges, le monde doit réaffirmer son engagement envers l'Agenda pour les femmes, la paix et la sécurité

 

POUR DIFFUSION IMMÉDIATE - 10 mars 2022, Aujourd'hui, à l'occasion de la Journée internationale des femmes juges, l'Association internationale des femmes juges (AIFJ) a publié une lettre multisignataires à la communauté internationale pour demander de l'aide pour l'évacuation et la réinstallation des femmes juges restantes qui sont pris au piège en Afghanistan.

 

« La situation des droits humains en Afghanistan continue de se détériorer », a déclaré la juge Susan Glazebrook, juge à la Cour suprême de Nouvelle-Zélande/ Te Koti Mana Nui et présidente de l' AIFJ . « Les talibans continuent d'ignorer les normes internationales, d'effacer la vie des femmes et de commettre des violations. Le tout alors qu'il y a une grave crise humanitaire. Nous appelons les dirigeants mondiaux à s'engager à nouveau à aider les personnes à risque et à fournir à ces femmes un passage sûr et une option de réinstallation permanente où elles peuvent reconstruire leur vie.

 

Alors que les femmes du monde entier célèbrent cette semaine la Journée internationale de la femme, les femmes qui restent bloquées en Afghanistan craignent pour leur vie et celle de leur famille, ont un accès limité à l'éducation et à l'emploi, et ne peuvent plus voyager seules sous le régime taliban. Aucune femme n'a été nommée au gouvernement de facto des talibans depuis la prise de pouvoir en août 2021.

 

« Les femmes juges, qui étaient l'épine dorsale du système judiciaire afghan et défendaient l'état de droit, restent en danger. Elles sont obligées de se cacher dans leurs maisons avec leurs familles, incapables de sortir de peur d'être reconnues », a déclaré la juge Patricia Whalen, membre de l'IAWJ et fondatrice du Rural Women Leadership Institute of Vermont . "Nous avons vu de grands actes de gentillesse et d'assistance à ce jour, mais il reste encore beaucoup à faire."

 

Plus de 30 organisations se sont jointes à l'appel international. Les signataires de la lettre sont le Raoul Wallenberg Center for Human Rights, Association internationale des juges / Union internationale des magistrats, la Commission internationale des personnes disparues et le Center for International Human Rights de la Northwestern University's Pritzker School of Law. La lettre est affichée sur la page d'accueil de l'AIFJ et est distribuée à toutes les nations.

 

###

 

Le président Biden, le secrétaire général Guterres et les dirigeants internationaux :

 

Des décennies de preuves ont montré que la répression et l'exclusion des femmes et des filles sont profondément liées à la violence, à la stagnation économique, à la fragilité et à l'échec de l'État. Le monde a reconnu l'exclusion des femmes comme une menace pour la paix et la sécurité internationales lorsque le Conseil de sécurité des Nations Unies a adopté la résolution 1325 sur les femmes, la paix et la sécurité en octobre 2000. Fortes de cet agenda, les femmes du monde entier, en partenariat avec la communauté internationale, ont réalisé des progrès remarquables dans certaines des régions les plus conflictuelles du monde. Mais alors même que nous célébrons ces progrès, la chute de l'Afghanistan et les terribles revers dus au pouvoir désormais entre les mains des dirigeants talibans, placez ce programme et tout ce qu'il représente à la croisée des chemins. Deux décennies de progrès acharnés en Afghanistan seront annulées à moins que la communauté internationale ne se réunisse pour prendre des mesures significatives en faveur des principes de la résolution 1325 du CSNU.

 

Depuis la prise de contrôle de l'Afghanistan, les talibans ont clairement fait savoir qu'ils considéraient les femmes comme des citoyennes de seconde classe et qu'ils n'avaient aucune intention de respecter les droits humains fondamentaux des femmes. Ils sont exclus de l'emploi et de la vie publique. Ils ont effectivement été supprimés de toute participation à la société afghane.

 

Les États-Unis et leurs partenaires internationaux doivent tenir leurs promesses envers le peuple afghan et redoubler d'efforts pour évacuer les Afghans à risque, en particulier les femmes juges et les défenseures des droits humains qui restent. Les femmes afghanes qui ont passé des décennies à travailler avec la communauté internationale pour faire progresser les droits de l'homme, la démocratie et l'état de droit se cachent désormais des talibans et d'autres extrémistes. Leur sûreté et leur sécurité ont été, au mieux, une réflexion après coup dans les opérations officielles de sauvetage et de réinstallation.

 

Des groupes de bénévoles et des ONG ont jusqu'ici dû combler ce trou béant. Mais avec des ressources limitées et n'ayant pas la capacité de faire le travail des gouvernements pour délivrer des documents de voyage, seule une fraction des femmes dirigeantes à risque a été secourue et beaucoup restent en danger en Afghanistan. Parmi cette population vulnérable figurent environ 90 femmes juges et leurs familles. Ce groupe comprend des femmes juges qui ont présidé des tribunaux financés par la communauté internationale. Ces juges ont jugé et condamné des membres talibans à la fois pour des activités criminelles régulières et devant les tribunaux spéciaux antiterroristes et les tribunaux chargés d'éliminer la violence à l'égard des femmes. Ces femmes se sont battues pour développer l'État de droit dans la démocratie naissante. Leur conviction et leur ferme adhésion à l'état de droit ont mis des milliers de talibans et d'autres extrémistes en prison. Beaucoup de ceux qu'ils ont condamnés sont maintenant libres et cherchent à se venger. Certaines sont de retour à des postes de pouvoir, ce qui leur donne le motif, l'opportunité et les ressources nécessaires pour persécuter et éliminer ces femmes. Le risque pour ces femmes et leurs sœurs procureurs ne peut être sous-estimé.

 

Ces femmes représentent l'investissement incroyable fait au fil des ans dans l'éducation, la formation et les échanges avec l'Afghanistan et sont une ressource précieuse pour l'avenir. Ils seront un élément clé d'un Afghanistan futur qui pourra être intégré à la communauté internationale.

 

Par conséquent, nous, soussignées, écrivons aujourd'hui au nom d'un réseau mondial de défenseurs des droits des femmes, y compris l'Association internationale des femmes juges, des institutions juridiques, des universités, d'anciens hauts fonctionnaires, des organisations de femmes travaillant en Afghanistan et d'autres dirigeants engagés qui ont se sont unis pour aider à soutenir les femmes à risque en Afghanistan. Nous demandons aux dirigeants internationaux d'intervenir pour aider ces femmes à quitter l'Afghanistan et de leur fournir une réinstallation permanente dans un pays - en délivrant des visas et des documents de voyage associés et en leur offrant un passage sûr - où elles peuvent recommencer leur vie et apporter les valeurs qu'elles défendent. prospérer et prospérer dans leur nouvelle maison, à l'abri de la menace et de la persécution.

 

La crédibilité et la viabilité future du programme Femmes, paix et sécurité dépendront des actions que la communauté internationale entreprendra pour le préserver aujourd'hui.

 

Sincèrement,

  • Association internationale des femmes juges
  • The Advocates for Human Rights
  • Afghan Legal Empowerment Portal
  • Justine Rukeba, AMS
  • War Crimes Research Office, Washington School of Law, American University
  • Sara Elizabeth Dill, Anethum Global
  • CAIR-Sacramento Valley/Central California
  • The Center for Peacebuilding
  • Central Asia Institute
  • Church World Service
  • Cohen Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, Keene State College
  • Core Skill Focus Organization (CSFO)
  • Equality Labs
  • Rebecca Blachly, Office of Government Relations, The Episcopal Church
  • Global Partnership for Afghanistan
  • Honor the Promise
  • International Association of Judges/Union Internationale des Magistrats
  • International Civil Society Action Network (ICAN)
  • International Commission on Missing Persons
  • Sunil Varghese, International Refugee Assistance Project (IRAP)
  • International Stability Operations Association (ISOA)
  • Internews
  • Irish Rule of Law International (IRLI)
  • MAPS-AMEN (American Muslim Empowerment Network)
  • Juliet Sorensen, Center for International Human Rights, Northwestern University Pritzker School of Law
  • The Raoul Wallenberg Centre for Human Rights
  • Rural Women Leadership Institute of Vermont
  • Special Operations Association of America
  • Tragedy Assistance Program for Survivors (TAPS) International
  • U.S. Committee for Refugees and Immigrants
  • Uplift Afghanistan Fund
  • Nejra Sumic, We Are All America
  • Women of Colour Working in Emergencies
  • Women's Campaign International
  • Robert Williams, Yale Law School